Boards of Canada

Boards of Canada are the duo of Michael Sandison (born June 1, 1970) and Marcus Eoin (born July 21, 1971). Based on the northern coast of Scotland, the group got its start on acclaimed experimental electronica label Skam in 1996 after recording an obscene number of tracks and pressing the best of them up as a miniscule-run 12″, Twoism, an eight-track promo EP the group sent to labels in lieu of a demonstration tape. The pair’s first official release appeared on Skam toward the middle of 1996, and was quickly hailed as among the label’s finest releases to date. Titled Hi Scores, the EP is an engaging mix of simple, infectious three-part synth melodies, subtle hip-hop and electro references, and alternately tense and relaxing beatwork endlessly repeated in shifting combinations (à la Autechre, Bochum Welt, and Cylob). Almost a mini-LP at six tracks and nearly half an hour in length, the debut was followed in late 1996 by a series of live gigs opening for Plaid and Autechre, as well as compilation tracks for Uvm and Skam/Musik Aus Strom side project label Mask (under the name Hellinterface).

Further releases for Skam, Mask, and 4th World in-house label Ampoule were scheduled, and in 1998 Boards of Canada issued Music Has the Right to Children, a landmark for electronic listening music that was widely copied. Nearly four years later (and after the release of only a single four-track EP and the archival Peel Sessions), the duo returned with its second LP, Geogaddi. Another long wait followed, until in October 2005 Boards of Canada released The Campfire Headphase, which introduced subtle changes into the pair’s sound. A six-track EP, Trans Canada Highway, appeared in May 2006. After seven years of silence, the duo announced new music was on the horizon in typically cryptic fashion: a mysterious album released on Record Store Day 2013 was one of several clues that Boards of Canada’s fourth album, the darker, more streamlined Tomorrow’s Harvest, would arrive that June.

stargaze c Emanuel Florakis/ s t a r g a z e

The Super Nova Sunday evening is dedicated to electronic music pioneers, Matthew Herbert and Boards of Canada. The happening is more than a concert – it challenges the whole concept of music and sounds and how we perceive them.

The evening starts with the reading of experimental producer, musician and artist Matthew Herbert’s ideas. His latest record was released in 2016 – as a book. The reading is in English.

“Somewhere buried in the last 100 years between the invention of the microphone, the tape machine, the sampler and the computer, music has undergone a formidable and profound revolution. Instead of making music with specifically designed instruments, we can now make music out of anything (whether it is intrinsically musical or not). Why use a violin when you can use a lawnmower? Why use a lawnmower when you can use the explosion of a bomb in Libya?
I would like this book then to be a kind of manifesto for sound that makes this shift explicit.”

Experts from the book will be read out aloud by Herbert himself.

s t a r g a z e’s Boards Of Canada project is based on their seminal High Scores ep which was recently re-released. The performance acknowledges the layered orchestrations of the originals, reimagining the colours stemming mostly from the band’s legendary arsenal of analogue synths by instrumental, semi-acoustic means. Since Boards Of Canada have abandoned the realm of live performance some time ago, stargaze have decided to humbly step into that void, as a hommage but also in order to create a live-set valid in its own right.

This special performance at Musical Nova is a collaboration between stargaze and Finland’s most acclaimed jazz drummer, Teppo Mäkynen.

Stargaze will also perform a new piece by Qasim Naqvi.

Boards of Canada

Boards of Canada are the duo of Michael Sandison (born June 1, 1970) and Marcus Eoin (born July 21, 1971). Based on the northern coast of Scotland, the group got its start on acclaimed experimental electronica label Skam in 1996 after recording an obscene number of tracks and pressing the best of them up as a miniscule-run 12″, Twoism, an eight-track promo EP the group sent to labels in lieu of a demonstration tape. The pair’s first official release appeared on Skam toward the middle of 1996, and was quickly hailed as among the label’s finest releases to date. Titled Hi Scores, the EP is an engaging mix of simple, infectious three-part synth melodies, subtle hip-hop and electro references, and alternately tense and relaxing beatwork endlessly repeated in shifting combinations (à la Autechre, Bochum Welt, and Cylob). Almost a mini-LP at six tracks and nearly half an hour in length, the debut was followed in late 1996 by a series of live gigs opening for Plaid and Autechre, as well as compilation tracks for Uvm and Skam/Musik Aus Strom side project label Mask (under the name Hellinterface).

Further releases for Skam, Mask, and 4th World in-house label Ampoule were scheduled, and in 1998 Boards of Canada issued Music Has the Right to Children, a landmark for electronic listening music that was widely copied. Nearly four years later (and after the release of only a single four-track EP and the archival Peel Sessions), the duo returned with its second LP, Geogaddi. Another long wait followed, until in October 2005 Boards of Canada released The Campfire Headphase, which introduced subtle changes into the pair’s sound. A six-track EP, Trans Canada Highway, appeared in May 2006. After seven years of silence, the duo announced new music was on the horizon in typically cryptic fashion: a mysterious album released on Record Store Day 2013 was one of several clues that Boards of Canada’s fourth album, the darker, more streamlined Tomorrow’s Harvest, would arrive that June.